New paper comparing chicken, pig and human gut microbiota

We have published a new paper comparing chicken, pig, human and even Antarctic penguin microbiota in the Microorganisms journal. Apparently strange idea has brought interesting findings. We have found out that bacteria belonging to phylum Bacteroidetes exhibit host adaptation while representatives of phylum Firmicutes were usually broadly distributed among different hosts. Host adaptation is not directly associated with taxonomic classification but correlates with the ability of gut anaerobes to survive in external environment. Bacterial species exhibiting some form of their existence resistant to aerobic environment may survive outside eukaryotic host and easily spread to another host. Since Firmicutes include spore forming Clostridiales and aerotolerant Bacillales, global distribution among different hosts is typical for them. On the other hand, anaerobic bacteria from phylum Bacteroidetes usually do not exhibit any form of their existence in aerobic environment and therefor spread only over a short distance, usually by contact among individuals of the same host species. This favours host adaptation and speciation what is indeed observed in these bacteria. Such findings may be important for the development of novel types of probiotics. In host adapted gut microbiota species it is recommended to consider their host preference. On the other hand, origin of probiotic strain is less important in the host non-adapted specie. However, to respect natural ecology of host non-adapted species, i.e. their permanent supply from environment, such probiotics should be provided for prolonged period of time, either via drinking water or feed.

For more information, click here.

 

INPOMED webinar

Dear colleagues,

on March 22, 2022, as a part of Interreg supported INPOMED project we organised an on-line webinar. The first presentation was given by Prof. Bernd Kaspers from Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich and was be focused on the importance of gut microbiota on the development of gut immune system. Second invited presentation was delivered by prof. Silke Rautenschlein from University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover covering a topic of Campylobacter interactions with chicken host. Following invited speaker’s presentations, results of INPOMED project partners were introduced in a form of four brief presentations. We hope that you have learnt at least something new and inspirative for you.

For the full recording of the whole webinar, click here.

INPOMED project on-line seminar

Dear colleagues,

it is our pleasure to announce that on March 22, 2022, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., on-line webinar will be organised. The seminar is part of the Interreg supported INPOMED project „INPOMED – Innovations in Poultry Medicine“. Seminar will start with two presentations by invited speakers. The first presentation will be given by Prof. Bernd Kaspers from Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich and will be focused on the importance of gut microbiota on the development of gut immune system. Second invited presentation will be delivered by prof. Silke Rautenschlein from University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover covering a topic of Campylobacter interactions with chicken host. Following invited speaker’s presentations, results of INPOMED project partners will be introduced in a form of four brief presentations. All presentations will be in English though questions can be raised in English, German or Czech language. We are looking forward to meet you on-line on March 22 at 1 p.m.

Direct Meeting Link: https://vyzkumnyustavveterinarniholekarstvi.my.webex.com/vyzkumnyustavveterinarniholekarstvi.my-cs/j.php?MTID=mb9e6feceb6846d258f0293de1a24603d

OR

Meeting Link: https://vyzkumnyustavveterinarniholekarstvi.my.webex.com/

Meeting number: 2364 863 9206

Password: Dfbp526rVpu

Seminar programme in English, German or Czech can be downloaded here.

 

Lactobacilli as probiotics for poultry

Lactobacilli are generally accepted as beneficial microbes. Despite this, in our hands, lactobacilli do not permanently colonise chicken intestinal tract and do not protect chickens against Salmonella Enteritidis challenge. We have repeatedly shown that if lactobacilli and Salmonella meet each other for the first time as late as in the chicken crop, lactobacilli administration does not lead to protection of chickens against Salmonella. However, if lactobacilli and Salmonella are simultaneouysly inoculated to chicken feed and conditions are set so that fermentation may proceed, metabolic activity of lactobacilli leads to decrease in pH and suppression of Salmonella viability. The most common and frequent probiotic effect of lactobacilli as probiotics is therefore expressed as fermentation and decrease in pH what results in suppression of other microbiota viability including pathogens like Salmonella. For more details, see HERE.